September 2, 2014
"One day, you will meet someone who will turn your world completely upside down. You will feel vulnerable. It might even be more terrifying than anything else you’ve ever experienced. But you will also feel things that you have never felt before, things that you thought only existed in fairy tales.

These people are worth waiting for. They are worth everything."

Tina Tran, No one else can compare (via avvfvl)

(Source: absentions, via better-than-yesterday)

September 1, 2014
Miss you.

Miss you.

September 1, 2014

Awesome German Home Improvement ad features life of a Goth girl and her very awesome Dad.

August 25, 2014

(Source: anotheroneusemyname, via milchb52)

August 22, 2014
The Pizza Belt: the Most Important Pizza Theory You’ll Read

As someone born and raised in the southern most tip of the pizza belt, I couldn’t support this theory more. No matter how you slice it, the truth is out now. I’m looking at you Chicago, LA and San Francisco. Thanks Max Reed and Gawker. Full story here.

For this reason, we speak of The Pizza Belt, a theory I have painstakingly constructed with assistance from various pizza experts on Twitter. 

  • The Pizza Belt is defined as “the area of the United States where the chance of obtaining an adequate-to-good slice of pizza from a randomly chosen pizzeria is greater than 50 percent.”
  • Taken at its strictest, The True Pizza Belt runs, more or less contiguously, hugging the coast, from southern New Jersey to Providence, R.I. (The map reproduced above provides a general but necessarily inexact guide.)
  • Lowering the chances to one in three, or slightly expanding our definition of “adequate,” gives us The Greater Pizza Belt Area, a zone spanning Washington D.C., to Boston, Mass., going no further inland than Albany, N.Y. [1]
  • Chicago is not in the Pizza Belt. I have no desire to discuss Chicago-style pizza.
  • Neither is San Francisco, for Christ’s sake.[2]
  • Indeed: Beyond the Greater Pizza Belt Area is a wasteland. In most parts of California, for example, the chance that a randomly-chosen pizzeria will produce adequate-to-good slices of pizza is close to one in eight; in Los Angeles it is lower than one in ten. Here, there is bad pizza—in the vast wilderness, in الربع الخالي‎. We do not speak of it.[3][4]

The Pizza Belt is the final word on regional variations in pizza quality in the United States. No further blog posts or discussions regarding the topic will be allowed from now on. Pizza-related opinions from people born and raised outside of the Pizza Belt are particularly unwelcome and will be dismissed with prejudice.

[1]This weekend, in Kingston, N.Y., I had a better-than-adequate slice at the first place I saw, a pizzeria called Primo (not to be confused with the chain). Such is the magic of the Pizza Belt.

[2]Again: A city’s location in the Pizza Belt is not determined by the question “Is it possible, given a research and travel budget, to obtain a good slice of pizza in this city?” The Pizza Belt is a scientific concept based on mathematics. You cannot disprove it by sending me to specific pizza places: All that proves to me is that your city is a major metropolitan area, and that you do not understand simple rhetorical and probabilistic concepts.

[3]Those born and raised inside the confines of the Pizza Belt, spoiled by its riches, often confuse “adequate pizza” for “bad pizza.” This is from whence complaints like the above—that Washington, D.C. cannot produce “a single decent slice”—arise. There is plenty of adequate pizza in Washington D.C., and some good pizza. Only those weaned on the pizza of New Jersey or Connecticut, and who have never encountered the horror of الربع الخالي‎, misunderstand that pizza as “bad.”

[4]Los Angeles, it goes without saying, is in the great southwestern Taco Belt, which is of course the subject of a different discussion.

 

August 20, 2014
10 Beautiful Interracial Arrests

August 13, 2014
Stream Michael Cera’s new album, True That. It sounds exactly like you would expect it to sound. I like Michael Cera and thus his jingly-jangly little album, is pure joy.

Stream Michael Cera’s new album, True That. It sounds exactly like you would expect it to sound. I like Michael Cera and thus his jingly-jangly little album, is pure joy.

August 13, 2014
vicemag:

Artists Pay Tribute to Robin Williams
Although you might have never uttered the words “I’m a huge Robin Williams fan,” I could probably rattle off at least five of his movies that you love, or that at the least made you very happy for a while. Robin Williams was omnipresent through a lot of our childhoods. Somehow, through the range and progression of his roles, he was able to rise up and meet my generation at whatever level of maturation we were at, from the age of about four onward until he stopped existing.
Learning how to channel grief is hard, especially when it’s over someone you didn’t know personally. I draw pictures, as do a lot of people I know. Robin Williams was a fan of comics and illustration, so I asked people to submit drawings of him in tribute.
Out of hundreds of submissions, here are the 15 I thought were best.
Image above: Alex Fine

Johnny Ryan
 

Nick Gazin

Brian Butler

Killer Acid
Continue

vicemag:

Artists Pay Tribute to Robin Williams

Although you might have never uttered the words “I’m a huge Robin Williams fan,” I could probably rattle off at least five of his movies that you love, or that at the least made you very happy for a while. Robin Williams was omnipresent through a lot of our childhoods. Somehow, through the range and progression of his roles, he was able to rise up and meet my generation at whatever level of maturation we were at, from the age of about four onward until he stopped existing.

Learning how to channel grief is hard, especially when it’s over someone you didn’t know personally. I draw pictures, as do a lot of people I know. Robin Williams was a fan of comics and illustration, so I asked people to submit drawings of him in tribute.

Out of hundreds of submissions, here are the 15 I thought were best.

Image above: Alex Fine

 

Nick Gazin

Brian Butler

Killer Acid

Continue

August 12, 2014

R.I.P Robin Williams. These lovely career moments and quotes courtesy of Mashable.

August 7, 2014
The graphic design legend expresses his concern for climate change in a new awareness campaign ominously tagged, "It’s not warming, it’s dying."
Glaser, 85, who created the iconic “I ♥ NY” logo more than 35 years ago, illustrates his global-warning message (see what I did there?) with stark simplicity. The central focus is a green disk representing Earth, its top half dark and lifeless.
The gradient image—brighter toward the bottom—is available in button form, five for $5, with proceeds going to produce more buttons. New Yorkers can check out a large version of the design on an East 23rd Street billboard at the School of Visual Arts. And there’s a Twitter feed, of course.
Discussing the campaign in Dezeen, Glaser explains that “symbolically, the disappearance of light” seemed to sum up the dire situation and provide the perfect design concept. Speaking with WNYC radio, he said, “Either Earth is dying or it’s beginning to grow again. My preference would be that it was beginning to grow again, but for the moment I have no evidence of that.”
Climate-change deniers will scoff at Glaser’s initiative, but I’m thinking any effort to generate debate and stimulate interest in humanity’s survival is a cool idea. via Adweek.

The graphic design legend expresses his concern for climate change in a new awareness campaign ominously tagged, "It’s not warming, it’s dying."

Glaser, 85, who created the iconic “I ♥ NY” logo more than 35 years ago, illustrates his global-warning message (see what I did there?) with stark simplicity. The central focus is a green disk representing Earth, its top half dark and lifeless.

The gradient image—brighter toward the bottom—is available in button form, five for $5, with proceeds going to produce more buttons. New Yorkers can check out a large version of the design on an East 23rd Street billboard at the School of Visual Arts. And there’s a Twitter feed, of course.

Discussing the campaign in Dezeen, Glaser explains that “symbolically, the disappearance of light” seemed to sum up the dire situation and provide the perfect design concept. Speaking with WNYC radio, he said, “Either Earth is dying or it’s beginning to grow again. My preference would be that it was beginning to grow again, but for the moment I have no evidence of that.”

Climate-change deniers will scoff at Glaser’s initiative, but I’m thinking any effort to generate debate and stimulate interest in humanity’s survival is a cool idea. via Adweek.

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